3D Printing. By the People. For the People.

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Harvard Business Review has written an article about 3D printing, one straightforwardly titled “3-D Printing Will Save the World.”  To those familiar with the industry, and savvy to the technology, the article adds little to the discussion.  But that doesn’t mean we don’t love it.   First things first: it’s another important milestone on the long road of 3D printing press attention.  Seeing an HBR headline filled us with the same sense of thrill and knowledge for what’s to come as we felt when we saw early articles in The..

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Why settle for a paltry 10% return on an oil and gas stock when you could earn north of 50% by putting your money on 3D printing?  Motley Fool writer Robert Zimmerman boldly asserts that additive manufacturing stock is poised to “smoke” oil and gas profits, and we kind of agree.   Aptly pointing out additive manufacturing heavy-hitter 3D Systems’ eye-popping year-over-year results (revenues were up 57%; gross profits were up 69%; diluted EPS rose a whopping 78%), Zimmerman makes a strong case for the viability of the industry.  A..

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Congrtats to the University of Washington Open Object Fabricators, a.k.a. “WOOF” on their recent 3D4D Challenge win.  Team members Bethany Weeks, Matthew Rogge, and Brandon Bowman were recognized at the recent 3D Printshow in London, where the honor was bestowed and the grand prize of $100,000 was announced.   The winning entry is beautiful in its intention and inspiring in its success–WOOF isn’t the first team to envision using waste plastic to make 3D printing input material, but they are among the first to develop a functional, replicable method.  The..

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Finally!  An exotic meat product that doesn’t taste like chicken.  Columbia, MO-based startup Modern Meadow is in the business of bioprinting meat!   You may be wondering: wouldn’t it be cheaper (let alone easier) to slaughter a beef cow if you’re craving a hamburger or a steak?  Sure, but the long-term goal is to produce a cost model that makes sense.  And, according to Co-founder Andras Forgacs, not only is printing your dinner more humane and less of an “environmental train wreck”–it’s much, much cooler to talk about at parties…

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Flashy, new additive manufacturing articles on the D.O.E. web site + the only State of the Union in years to tangibly address manufacturing competitiveness = a very, very good sign for 3-D printing.  Lip service is one thing–but $30 million in federal funding and $40 million in matching contributions from a consortium of industry, academic, and non-profit players is another.  This new partnership–the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII)–will indisputably play into the future of manufacturing in the U.S.   For those unfamiliar with additive manufacturing, the announcement serves to..

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Lately there has been discussion about furthering open development for the 3D Printing industry.  Fabricastl supports open development and adds the following point to the debate:   3D printing has at its core a unique element of openness. Accordingly, open development is the prime way to harness the technology. It is an iterative concept. The unique element of openness is the flexibility.  There is a major constraint 3D Printing removes and thereby opens up humankind’s means of fabrication – the need for customized fabrication equipment.  It is one device to..

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We were surprised (and pleased) to see MakerBot this year at San Diego Comic-Con.  Nestled between a collectibles stand and a try-your-hand-at-comic-drawing station, comic enthusiasts and sci-fi geeks gathered, rapt, around three working printers at the MakerBot booth.  The familiarity of the fascinated group seemed much lower than that of the Maker Faire and other maker community events.  It was clear that the Comic-Con crew had seen nothing like this before. “We’re the only 3-D printing outfit here,” admitted MakerBot Head of Sales, Jeff Osborn.  We think they’re simply the..

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Mainstream manufacturing is not the future of 3D printing.  It’s a way station to the real destination: consumers.  Just as web surfing made way for blogging, and television made way for YouTube, so also will the additive manufacturing industry make creators out of us all. That’s right.  Combine technological improvements (e.g., design software, equipment capabilities, materials science) with public discovery, and the inevitable result is creation.  We believe the mainstreaming of additive manufacturing will surpass the Internet in its ability to release the intense creative power latent within the common..

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Want to know why? Because voxels are here. Voxels, as in, volumetric pixels that can be placed as deliberately and precisely as their 2D predecessors. That’s right–you can now design your manufactured items, voxel by voxel, for 3D manufacture, as raised at today’s AMUG conference by Objet. So, how big is a voxel? You’d do better to ask how small. Right now, 4 Million voxels are required to make the smallest Lego block. We’re not afraid to say we think that Objet’s voxel editing capabilities are really, really cool. Vive..

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We’ve gotten in the car and headed south toward Costa Mesa.  We’ve stopped at In ‘n Out Burger and Del Taco an undisclosed number of times on the way.  We’ve checked in to the hotel.  We’ve registered.  We’re here. So, where are you?  Are you here or on your way?  Who (or what) at are you most looking forward to seeing?  Tell us, and if you see someone who looks like he might do this at any moment… …don’t be shy.  Introduce yourself.  

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